A western wind essay

Its small rooms house a large, haphazard collection of antique and vintage toys — tin cars and trains; board games from the s; figures of animals and people in wood, plastic, lead; paint-chipped and faintly dangerous-looking rocking horses; stuffed teddy bears from the early 20th century; even — purportedly — a 4, year old mouse fashioned from Nile clay. One-hundred-and-fifty-year-old Victorian dolls, rare dolls with wax faces. Dolls with cheery countenances, dolls with stern expressions.

A western wind essay

Its small rooms house a large, haphazard collection of antique and vintage toys — tin cars and trains; board games from the s; figures of animals and people in wood, plastic, lead; paint-chipped and faintly dangerous-looking rocking horses; stuffed teddy bears from the early 20th century; even — purportedly — a 4, year old mouse fashioned from Nile clay.

One-hundred-and-fifty-year-old Victorian dolls, rare dolls with wax faces. Dolls with cheery countenances, dolls with stern expressions.

A western wind essay

Sweet dolls and vaguely sinister dolls. One glassed-off nook of a room is crammed with porcelain-faced dolls in 19th-century clothing, sitting in vintage model carriages and propped up in wrought iron bedsteads, as if in a miniaturized, overcrowded Victorian orphanage.

And it happens more often during the winter, when the sun goes down early and the rooms are a bit darker. And that is a different emotional state all together. Read about the history and psychology of scary clowns Dolls have been a part of human play for thousands of years — ina 4,year-old stone doll was unearthed in an archeological dig on the Mediterranean island of Pantelleria; the British Museum has several examples of ancient Egyptian rag dollsmade of papyrus-stuffed linen.

Over millennia, toy dolls crossed continents and social strata, were made from sticks and rags, porcelain and vinyl, and have been found in the hands of children everywhere. Just as much as they could be made out of anything, they could be made into anything.

For example, she says, by the end of the 19th century, many parents no longer saw their children as unfinished adults, but rather regarded childhood as a time of innocence that ought to be protected.

Dolls also have an instructional function, often reinforcing gender norms and social behavior: Through the 18th and 19th century, dressing up dolls gave little girls the opportunity to learn to sew or knit; Hogan says girls also used to act out social interactions with their dolls, not only the classic tea parties, but also more complicated social rituals such as funerals as well.

In the early 20th century, right around the time that women were increasingly leaving the home and entering the workplace, infant dolls became more popular, inducting young girls into a cult of maternal domesticity. In the second half of the 20th century, Barbie and her myriad career and sartorial options provided girls with alternative aspirations, while action figures offered boys a socially acceptable way to play with dolls.

The recent glut of boy-crazy, bizarrely proportioned, hyper-consumerist girl dolls think BratzMonster High says something about both how society sees girls and how girls see themselves, although what is for another discussion.

So dolls, without meaning to, mean a lot. But one of the more relatively recent ways we relate to dolls is as strange objects of — and this is a totally scientific term — creepiness. Creepiness, McAndrew says, comes down to uncertainty. If something is clearly frightening, you scream, you run away.

But in the absence of real evidence of a threat, we wait and in the meantime, call them creepy. The creeped out response, McAndrew theorized, is shaped by the twin forces of being attuned to potential threats, and therefore out-of-the-ordinary behavior, and of being wary of rocking the social boat.

Dolls inhabit this area of uncertainty largely because they look human but we know they are not. The key is that it has to be the right level of mimicry — too much or too little and we get creeped out.

College Essay One

In a study published in Psychological Science inresearchers from the University of Groningen in the Netherlands found that inappropriate nonverbal mimicry produced a physical response in the creeped out subject: The uncanny valley refers to the idea that human react favorably to humanoid figures until a point at which these figures become too human.

At that point, the small differences between the human and the inhuman — maybe an awkward gait, an inability to use appropriate eye contact or speech patterns — become amplified to the point of discomfort, unease, disgust, and terror.

But the uncanny valley is, for scientists and psychologists alike, a woolly area. Maybe like the Supreme Court standard for obscenity, we know uncanny, creepy humanoids when we see them?

Only when they began to look too human, did dolls start to become creepy, uncanny, and psychology began investigating. Which presents an interesting phenomenon: The creepiness of realistic dolls is complicated by the fact that some people want dolls and robots that look as lifelike as possible.

The more lifelike an infant doll is — and some of them even boast heartbeats, breathing motionand cooing — the more desirable it is among reborn devotees, but equally, the more it seems to repulse the general public. Perhaps it comes down to what we can make dolls into.

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But the doll was creepy well before Hollywood came calling. In the 18th and 19th centuries, as dolls became more realistic and as their brethren, the automata, performed more dexterous feats, artists and writers began exploring the horror of that almost immediately.Top 41 Successful Common App Essays.

These college essays are from students who got accepted at Common kaja-net.com them to get inspiration for your own essays and knock the socks off those admissions officers! click here Energy and Human Evolution by David Price. Please address correspondence to Dr.

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A western wind essay

Thirty-five-hundred square miles of prairie and mountains in western Wyoming, the. THE SPIKE. It was late-afternoon. Forty-nine of us, forty-eight men and one woman, lay on the green waiting for the spike to open.

We were too tired to talk much. A Problem With Wind Power [kaja-net.com] [click here for printer-friendly PDF]by Eric Rosenbloom Wind power promises a clean and free source of electricity that would reduce our dependence on imported fossil fuels and the output of greenhouse gases and other pollution.

Many governments are therefore promoting the construction of vast wind "farms," encouraging private companies with .

A Problem With Wind Power [kaja-net.com]