A descriptions of the reasons to visit museums and galleries

By Tricia Tongco Gina Ferazzi via Getty Images When it comes to solitary activities and bravery, going to a museum alone falls somewhere between going solo to the movies and eating lunch on your own at a restaurant.

A descriptions of the reasons to visit museums and galleries

Museums preserve and display our artistic, social, scientific and political heritage. Everyone should have access to such important cultural resources as part of active citizenship, and because of the educational opportunities they offer to people of every age. If museums are not funded sufficiently by the government, they will be forced to charge for entry, and this will inevitably deter many potential visitors, especially the poor and those whose educational and cultural opportunities have already been limited.

Free access is essential to provide freedom of cultural and educational opportunity. Not everyone wishes to visit museums, which are essentially a form of entertainment for the middle classes and tourists. The majority of adults never visit a museum, preferring instead leisure pursuits such as football, the cinema or clubbing.

Why should they have to pay for their chosen entertainment while subsidising the generally wealthier middle class through their taxes? Tourists pay no taxes here and so gain a free ride at the expense of domestic taxpayers. The state provides educational opportunities for all through free schooling, which often includes free museum trips.

Museums Should Be Free Yes because Museums are a crucial source of inspiration and education for our increasingly important creative in Museums are a crucial source of inspiration and education for our increasingly important creative industries e.

Free access is an investment in the future of this sector of the economy and therefore has long-term benefits in securing prosperity for the whole of society. Similarly, tourism is an important sector of our economy and many visitors will be deterred from visiting our country if they think it will be very expensive to visit its great museums and galleries.

Tourists do contribute hugely to government revenues through the indirect taxes they pay and the jobs they generate, so free museum access to support the tourism industry is a sensible investment. Such potential economic benefits are dubious and rely upon access to collections that are excellent in their content and in the way in which they are conserved and displayed.

This will not help our creative industries or tourism. It is excellence rather than the cost of visiting attractions which attracts tourists in any case. Free access will encourage more people to find out about their country and help to promote feelings of national unity and identity, while promoting greater understanding and acceptance of foreign cultures.

If museums are entirely funded by the state, they will have little incentive to increase visitor numbers and to make their collections exciting and accessible for all. The need to attract paying customers concentrates the minds of museum and gallery directors upon the needs of the public and produces imaginative and popular exhibitions, as well as adding value through guided tours, lectures and tie-ins with television programmes.

All of this ensures that more people, not less visit museums. In addition, if museums were made entirely reliant upon public funding, it is likely that money would be channelled to those institutions the government felt were most important, forcing smaller, local or more specialist museums to close.

Nazi Germany also points to the dangers of allowing politicians control over interpretations of national identity and presentations of other cultures.

Television is not an adequate substitute for widely accessible museums. At a museum a visitor can c At a museum a visitor can choose what to see and for how long they wish to study it; television is a much more passive medium making the viewer dependent upon the interests and interpretation of the producer - it is likely to present sensationalist and controversial material in a bid for ratings, for example.

Nor can a two-dimensional medium compare to viewing an object, even a flat painting, from many different angles, or even handling it, in a museum. Today television plays a much greater role in transmitting our cultural heritage and a sense of national identity.Galleries can also be "one-stop shopping" for interior designers, architects, and other professionals who need art, but simply cannot, for reasons of time, go to every single artist's studio to .

Travel guides are filled to the brim with listings for museums and art galleries, each less enticing than the last.

A descriptions of the reasons to visit museums and galleries

After all, it's what sensible, sophisticated travellers do. 10 REASONS TO VISIT ART GALLERIES. This is a fantastic reason to visit art galleries. All you have to do leave your fear at the door, walk in, smile, say hello to your greeter (if there is one), quietly walk around and enjoy your visual feast.

Contemporary art museums aren't the only places to learn about art. You can learn plenty in. The Importance of Taking Children to Museums. June 20, transforming galleries into laboratories of ideas." Our first visit to a museum was when my son was only six weeks old, and over the past few years we have visited science centers, natural history museums, traditional history museums, art museums, botanical gardens, and of.

Our first visit to a museum was when my son was only six weeks old, and over the past few years we have visited science centers, natural history museums, traditional history museums, art museums, botanical gardens, and of course children’s museums.

An art museum or art gallery is a building or space for the exhibition of art, pastels, watercolors, prints, and photographs are typically not permanently displayed for conservation reasons.

Instead, public access to these materials is provided by a dedicated print study room located within the museum. This view of the art museum.

10 Reasons to Visit The National Portrait Gallery, London - Guide London